• BACHELORbydale at Watchcase Factory HHH Showhouse 2014

    As the summer draws to a close, here is a look at our work for Sag Harbor’s historic Watchcase Factory‘s Showhouse by Holiday House Hamptons.  We designed a terrace overlooking the beautiful new condominium complex created by the team at Cape Advisors.

    Holiday House Hamptons 2014 - Dale Cohen Design Studio

    the Watchcase Townhouse terrace covered with Shademaker’s cantilevered umbrella.

    The plantings throughout the terrace were created by The Laurel Group in Watermill, NY.

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    the Watchcase Factory townhouse terrace prior to installation

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    the Watchcase property under construction this past spring.

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    Kalamazoo’s outdoor kitchen and pizza oven.

     

    The Townhouse Terrace is the perfect lounge spot, it overlooks the center of the new Watchcase Factory  complex.  The Terrace with it’s L-shape lends itself to multiple seating areas and there is no room for a real dining table … So we created a bar area for eating and drinking, all the better for summer lounging for my bachelor clients.

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    Best and Company NYC walnut bar with Manuti stools from WALTERS

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    Manut’s stools, provided to us by WALTERS

    As you enter the terrace you walk out onto long walnut bar counters, the work of Best and Company, with Kalamazoo’s outdoor pizza kitchen just to your left.

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    the Summer of Bachelor Townhouse Terrace

    From it’s perch over the center courtyard, the terrace lends itself to lounging and taking in the sights. With the help of our whole team, we created a chic outdoor lounge for bachelors to do their summer entertaining.

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    Sifas Sakura seating

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    Sifas Oskar seating and BB Italia side tables.

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    Sifas Oskar seating.

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    Kenna Panton’s “driftwood totem”

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    Kenna Panton’s “driftwood totem”

    Artist Kenna Panton’s created a unique piece of sculpture for our terrace.  It is an 8 foot tall driftwood totem with ‘fungi’ created from fused glass.

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    the Watchcase Factory under construction

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    Vintage golf clubs from Haggins Mortimer Design.

    At the far side of the terrace there is a long walk way to a future outdoor shower.  For the Showhouse we thought it would be great to have some fun and games.  We installed a putting green.

     

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    plantings by the Laurel Group

    Enjoy the end of summer! and please take a moment to “like” our fb page.

  • Interview with William Sonoma’s cultivate blog “The Single Guy’s Kitchen Designer”

    Last summer I was interviewed for William Sonoma’s kitchen blog cultivate, for their “countertalk” section.  It was a fun talking about my work with bachelors.  Below is the interview , “In the Kitchen with Dale Cohen, The Single Guy’s Kitchen Designer” written by Stephanie Gibson.


    Photo: Andrew Schwartz

    How did one leading interior designer find herself transforming the kitchens of Manhattan’s most stylish but design-befuddled bachelors into elegant, grown-up spaces? Hint: It didn’t involve a rose. After moving from Los Angeles to New York City a decade ago and honing her skills at a pair of top firms, designer Dale Cohen opened her own business—dale cohen designstudio—and started offering design insights to single men on her blog, BACHELORbydale.com. Now she specializes in creating luxe interiors for discerning big-city clients—especially bachelors who are looking to land a dream kitchen (and perhaps a dream date). Dale does it all—renovation, design and decor—and Cultivate sat down with her to discuss how she transforms man-cave kitchens into appealing spaces.

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    Renderings of a recent bachelor remodel; dale cohen designstudio

    CULTIVATE: What made you decide to work with bachelors in need of design help?

    DALE COHEN: It’s something I’m very interested in. I was trained to design, but I started [in design] as a kid. My dad taught me how to see things architecturally and also how to shop—ultimately, I learned to shop like a man: in and out in 15 minutes.  I do really well with the way that men think: They have less patience with shopping, as do I, so I get where they’re coming from. I give them short, directive, limited choices. And Williams-Sonoma is where I purchase 75 percent of kitchen supplies. I go straight to the utensil wall and grab every corkscrew, peeler and scraper, plus All-Clad pots and pans.

    All-Clad stainless steel from Williams-Sonoma

    CULTIVATE: So, what, exactly, are bachelors looking for in their kitchens?

    DALE COHEN: For someone else to use them! Usually guys—across the board—are looking for ease of use. It’s simple. [They want] a wine spot, a bar area—very little that has anything to do with cooking! I buy paper towels, glasses, dish soap, a trash can, towels, dishes, flatware—all of it. They don’t care. They want it done, and they want it to be easy. And they usually trust very shortly into the process that I’ll handle it. [My team doesn’t] just buy it; we unpack and install.

    CULTIVATE: Do you ever offer them tips on how to win a woman over in the kitchen?

    DALE COHEN: I don’t get involved in that! Usually it works out on its own accord. If you’re nesting to that extent, the universe provides. That’s my philosophy.

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    CULTIVATE: Where do you splurge in an urban kitchen?

    DALE COHEN: I think you have to splurge—especially in New York City—on custom cabinetry. I have to account for every quarter-inch. I can’t get what I need even from fancy European cabinets. I have to use every single inch, so custom cabinets are a must.

    CULTIVATE: What is the most important element you consider when designing kitchens?

    DALE COHEN: A good plan is everything! The actual location of elements is most important; anything else can be solved after that. It’s a serious puzzle in the city—where things go is important, regardless if it’s a small space or large.